Category Archives: leftovers

Energizing Rainbow Vegetable Broth Recipe


‘Eat a Rainbow’ we hear more and more often from doctors when they refer to the variety of vibrantly colored fruits and vegetables to include in our diets to give our immune system the benefit of a range of antioxidants. This simple rainbow broth that you can start or finish your day with or just drink throughout the day will for sure help to strengthen the immune system and help combat winter fatigue and melancholy.  With this year’s never-ending severe winter, I am taken by Japanese traditional types of breakfast, which has actually led to many experiments with different kind of stocks and broths, hence this particular post is all about starting your day with a trendy sip of warm broth (with uber healthy alkalizing and anti-inflammatory properties) instead of the usual and boring bowl of cold cereal. Most importantly, a few sips of this broth fill you up so well, the ”Hara Hachi Bu” (eat until you are 80 percent full), a famous Okinawans principle becomes really easy to follow…

This is our next morning Sunday Brunch photo: Rainbow Broth & Fried Sushi – What a Wonderful Marriage!

Well, may be except for this case, although the broth does help to stop devouring the sushi a bit earlier…

Another upside of this broth is that its vegan, easy to pull off and/or modify to your taste, and can be made either from scratch (on a budget) or to recycle the collection of the quality veggie’s scrap assuring a great range of essential nutrients. Excellent recipe to take a note of if you are going to detox, to fast during the lent, or to start taking better care of your lunches (absolutely awesome in combination with classic egg or tuna salad sandwich, for example). It is also a wonderful starting point for further interesting layering with other ingredients: from hot noodle/dumpling soups to cold soups with fresh veggies additions. 
The humble rainbow ingredients are: potato, leek, radish, celery, carrot, scallion, ginger, and beet: 
For and extra detox properties, flavor and kick, I also added kombu (kelp) seaweed, jalapeno, coriander and black peppercorn seeds:

And the last, but not least: cover the veggies with quality mineral/spring water.
The unusual variety of the stock ingredients gives it a unique light flavor with some Asian notes of ginger, seaweed and coriander. Radish makes definitely lighter touch than usual rutabaga/turnips while beet gives the broth a radiant ruby color and agreeable sweetness. The reconstituted wakame seaweed adds an extra comfort touch bringing the taste of broth closer to that of the Miso soup.
Stir in some quality fermented Miso paste and you are one step closer to the Japanese heaven:
 KILLER APP: Alternatively, collect the variety of any best quality vegetable scraps in your freezer (in Ziploc bag) until ready to use to make a stock.
For more further applications, feel free to exclude the beet ingredient and you will have a perfect vegan stock full of goodness, that you can bring to the next level as per my next post. In fact, this post was a prelude to the mystery dish I’m going to offer you next based on the vegan stock. Here’s the hint. Stay tuned.
Speaking of, Happy Chinese New Year, dear readers!

PS: SATURDAY AFTERNOON REPORT. This is what we just had (a day after me featuring the proverbial broth): the out of this world fried sushi I made last night on a wing, but was too tired to eat at midnight to avoid having my next visceral cauchemar… We just had them now for brunch, and LIFE CAN’T BE ANY MORE BEAUTIFUL. Viva Japanese breakfast!

  PS2: God, I need to start Instagram!

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Two other major vegetarian must try recipes for this time of the year:
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RAINBOW VEGETABLE BROTH
Yields: 2 generous or 4 small portions
Ingredients:
1 potato with skin on, chopped
½ leek, chopped
1 carrot with skin on, chopped
1 celery stalk, chopped
1 beet with skin on, chopped*
1 radish with skin on, sliced
2 slices of fresh ginger
1 scallion, quartered
1 spring of parsley
1-2 pieces of dried kombu (kelp) seaweed (optional)
1 jalapeno pepper, chopped (optional)
1 tsp coriander seeds
8 black peppercorns (optional)
31/2 cups quality mineral/spring water
1 tbsp dried wakame seaweed to garnish (optional)
Instructions:
Place all the ingredients in a large saucepan, add the mineral water and bring to boil. Cover and simmer for 1 ½-2 hours over low heat.
Remove the pan from the heat and strain the liquid. Discard the vegetables. Pour the broth into a heatproof resealable container. Add dried wakame seaweed and seal. Drink glassfuls of the broth throughout the day.
*Excluding the beet from the list of ingredients will deliver classic looking vegetarian stock as opposed to red-colored stock.
Adapted from: Healing Foods, DK Publishing, 2013

Match Point Carrot Cake for Thanksgiving


Don’t leave this cake unattended at your party because it will disappear in seconds and you won’t even notice that. Yep, that’s how good it is! Rather, keep it in the fridge until last minute to actually hear those OHHH and AHHH from your guests (it will still disappear, but at least you get to collect some kudos). Though the title for this recipe makes it sound as if we were going to re-watch Hitchcock’s ‘Strangers on a Train’, or Allen’s ‘Match Point’, or have some sort of tennis tournament in between, it’s really just to show how we came to the idea of this dessert and how it became such a winning recipe for our Thanksgiving table. With the Riesling wine jelly glaze and decadent salted maple caramel sauce, the take on a traditional Swiss cake has never been tastier.
This year we didn’t have to really cast for a Thanksgiving dessert. The idea landed on our kitchen counter along with the mountain of fresh carrot juice pulp leftovers during our Saturday breakfast. What to do with all this goodness? We didn’t want to send it to the compost and were determined to make some use of the fresh majestically orange fiber. 
Carrot cake came as a natural answer (you can use mince grated carrot in place of the pulp if you want). We recycled carrot juice pulp before just by mixing it with nuts, maple syrup, raisins and spice and pressing the mix into the bundt pan to have a no-bake healthy (gluten, dairy and eggs-free) dessert or snack upon refrigerating it overnight. But this time we wanted something special, after all, it’s Thanksgiving. Classic Swiss carrot cake romantically named Rublitortesounded like something approaching that healthy vegan cake (as much as any traditional dessert can be healthy): almonds, carrots, almost no flour or butter… and it gets better with time, so making it few days before Thanksgiving was a smart idea.

Applying the white wine jelly glaze over instead of the classic apricot jelly was a grown up step up in the finishing touch (microwave jelly in increments for 30 seconds and stir each time until almost pourable consistency). When it came to the traditional lemon-sugar glaze however, I wasn’t satisfied: it tasted too 70ies and lacked ‘personality’ in terms of a great cake’s buttery touch.  We expertly played with cream cheese (first), Mascarpone (second) and whipped cream (third) on a side – they were all good, yet they still didn’t taste like perfect match. And then, BOOM-BAM, the idea of the salty caramel sauce dressing has arrived and made a real hinge point of the recipe. 

I used the fellow-blogger recipe of Ree Drummond, which I made before and loved, except I added some maple syrup to it (feel free to use brown sugar only (1 full cup) as her recipe stipulates) for an extra flavor. And that was where the magic happened: the finger-licking salted caramel sauce has turned the traditional carrot cake into a gourmand-endorsed upscale modern confection we were exactly looking for. 
Our Thanksgiving Monday was workaholic-industrious, having approximately this kind of beat.
The long week-end is always extremely vital for the seasonal backyard works. Seven of us were crazy-busy cleaning-up the garden before frost.  Removing dead leaves, needles and rotten apples; cutting perennials, branches and bushes; mulching; planting spring bulbs and new perennials; transplanting; patching the grass; working out compost, making barn repairs… (I’m already tired just listing this). 
Finally, we also had to fell another tree with almost bare hands and it was tough and dangerous (the tree was close to power lines). Guess what, this morning they gave a killer app on the radio, that cutting or pruning trees that grow close to the voltage lines can be done for free by Hydro Quebec http://www.hydroquebec.com/trees/entretien.html– WHOA! You live, you learn (and you are welcome) – that gives a hope next time we will be less exhausted. Everyone was dog-tired, even the doggie…
Kicking back at Thanksgiving dinner was more than well-deserved. Naturally, the dinner would not be complete without the roast turkey, succulent braised beef with gnocchi and mixed greens salad. But the carrot cake was a show stopper.  

It was euphoria inducing delicious and everyone raved about salted caramel applied to it (match point it was). Later that night we crashed on the sofas determined to re-watch one of the above-mentioned movies, but fell asleep as soon as our heads touched the pillows…

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One year ago: No Fuss Coq au Vin 
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SWISS CARROT CAKE RUBLITORTE with SALTED MAPLE CARAMEL SAUCE
Yields: 10 portions
Carrot Cake:
2 cups (275 g) raw carrot pulp, or freshly grated and firmly packed
3 cups (300 g) almond (and/or hazelnut) meal
½ lemon zest
½ cup (60 g) flour (opt for gluten free flour if wish be)
1 heaping tsp dry yeast
1 tsp cinnamon (optional)
1 ½ tsp sea salt
5 eggs, yolks and whites separated
1 ½ cup powdered sugar (187 g)
1 tbsp butter to grease the pan
2 tbsp apricot or Riesling jelly, liquefied for the glaze
1/2 cup slivered almonds for garnish, toasted
Lemon Sugar Icing: (optional)
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup icing sugar, sifted
1 tbsp water
Preheat the oven to 425F.
Combine carrots, nuts and zest in a bowl. Add cinnamon, flour, yeast and salt and mix.
Beat egg yolks with sugar until thick. Stir into the carrot mixture. Beat egg whites until the stiff peaks form. Gently fold the whites into carrot mixture. Do not over-mix.
Grease the 9 inch diameter spring form pan and sprinkle with flour. Shake to coat evenly. Pour batter into the pan. Bake for 50 minutes or until the knife tester comes out clean. Let cool.
Remove sides from the pan and place the cake over the wire rack that has been set over wax paper to catch the drips. Spoon the glaze over the top of the cake letting it to drip to the sides. Even out the glaze with spatula. Garnish with toasted almonds.
Refrigerate from overnight for up to 3 days in a tightly covered cake box from overnight to 3-5 days. Serve with salted maple caramel sauce.
Salted Maple Caramel Sauce:
½ cup maple syrup
½ cup brown sugar
½ cup half & half cream
4 tbsp butter
Pinch of salt
1 tbsp vanilla extract
Instructions:
Mix the maple syrup, brown sugar, cream, butter and salt in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Cook while whisking gently for 5-7 minutes, until it thickens. Add vanilla and cook for another minute to thicken further. Set aside. Use at the room temperature.
Adapted from: Easy Caramel Sauce by Ree Drummond, Food Network, Ranching in the Mist, 2011.

No Ordinary French Toast Strawberry Rhubarb Bake

If you love French toast in its many varieties like I do, you probably know already that a baked version of a French toast with some fresh fruit in it is a Rolls Royce of the toasts. Crunchy and nutty on top, aromatic, tangy, sweet and runny inside, relatively benign in sugar: a real old school culinary gem revisited. And, it’s actually a snap to construct. The most difficult part is to allow the flavours to macerate overnight in the fridge.

Next morning you can cough it up within 45 minutes of baking. And don’t limit yourself to just fresh strawberries and rhubarb. This baked toast will be as delicious with the combinations of blueberries, blackberries and lemon; quince, pear and passion fruit; apples and cranberries, etc. We made it last week-end for the Father’s day.
It’s not unusual for me to be lost in the dish choices when preparing for the event and this time was no different. How I came up with this idea was a bit weird but worked out for good. I wanted to make something special, a one of a kind dish (preferably for breakfast). Driven by a nostalgic desire for simplicity, I tried to reach my inner Escoffier for a quick advice.
The great chef must have been on a sick leave though ‘cause the only answer was: ‘Make a Layer Cake’. That was obviously clueless: ‘Layer Cake? Really? In the middle of summer? For the Father’s Day? Are you kidding me?’ Pause. ‘OK, then bring him to a diner dive’, clearly, Chef Fieri just took the mind shift. ‘Are you serious? Not even a Melba Peach or something for breakfast?’ Then either legendary Monsieur Auguste or the years of legal reasoning kicked in: Melba – Toast – French Toast- Specialty French Toast – Specialty French Toast for a French (Canadian) Father…and Oh, he loves bread…now we are talking… My inner dialogue was interrupted by the patriarch himself: ‘Hey, did you see how much rhubrarb we got this year? And I think it’s ready…’
BINGO, this is gonna be a FRENCH TOAST-RHUBARB-STRAWBERRY-BAKE for breakfast and I can smell it already in my mind. The other day I made crumbs to finish the gluten free rice flour loaf (excellent for topping mixed with nuts, butter and maple syrup or brown sugar) and we always have a baguette or two (feel free to use white gluten free bread if you’re gluten intolerant), eggs and milk in our fridge. Plus locally grown strawberries from a farmers market, and now freshly picked rhubarb – it will be a yummy.
Please note again that this is an overnight dish. But other than that is a real easy-peasy. Rip the one day loaf or baguette into small chunks and spread into 9 by 13 inch baking dish. Chop-chop-chop: strawberries, rhubarb (I always peel the rhubarb stems before chopping them, but apparently it is not a must anymore). Macerate the fruits with sugar and a bit of water – done. 
Next, beat the egg & milk (or substitute) mixture with a bit of sugar, a pinch of ground nutmeg and cinnamon. Pour half of it over the bread chunks. Spread the macerated fruit mix over. Cover with the egg-milk mix and slide the baking into the fridge overnight covered with film to let the flavours marry.
Note: Although totally optional, if you happen to have some Grand Marnier or brandy in your bar, add a splash to the egg-milk mixture for that special French touch of it.
Next morning preheat the oven to 350F, spread the nuts-butter- crumble topping to cover the toast dish and pop into the oven for 45-55 minutes (3 last images in the collage). When the house is filled with the caramelized fruit aroma, the crust is golden brown and crispy, and the body of the toast is still slightly bubbling – it’s ready. Let it sit for 10-15 minutes before cutting. Serve with some extra fresh fruit and whipped cream if you like.
Our French (Canadian) father was smiling mischievously when he stepped into the kitchen next morning … and then the wide grin at the breakfast said it all. The no ordinary French Toast was a huge success.  If you happen to have any leftovers, reheat them in the individual ramekins next morning and they will still taste amazing.

And what do you think happened after this amazing breakfast? Well, may be somewhere around the Beltway fathers go play baseball with their kids all day long, but here in Canada – nah-nah-nah – think more of a ‘Canadian Bacon’ or ‘The Great Outdoors’…

Our father went to fell a tree with a chainsaw. Yep, that’s what he did last week-end. One of the gorgeous fir trees in our backyard has dangerously grown into the foundation of the house threatening that one day (or sooner) it will be either us or the tree residing in the dwelling, so, sadly, we had to let it go. And it was a hell of a job…
The prospect to go fishing next week-end helped to keep the spirits up and the BBQ family dinner with Bourbon Glazed Ribs, roasted new potatoes and chopped salad washed down by copious amounts of Cabernet Sauvignon wrapped the day quite successfully… not without an idea to make the whole next week a Father’s day week.
Cheers to all the great Fathers and I hope some of you will actually try this worthy dish! 
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RHUBARB STRAWBERRY FRENCH TOAST BAKE
Yields: 6-8 portions
Ingredients:
1 baguette or French loaf, day old*
2 cups milk (or mix of yogurt and milk, or 5% or 10% cream, or almond milk depending on your diet)
7 eggs, slightly beaten
1 tbsp sugar or maple syrup
½ tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp ground nutmeg
Splash of brandy or orange liquor (optional)
Pinch of salt
For Macerated Fruit Coulis
2 cups rhubarb, chopped in ½ inch pieces
2 cups strawberries, chopped in ½ inch pieces
½ cup of sugar, or maple syrup
2 tbsp water
For Nutty Topping Crumble
1 cup white fresh crumbs* (baguette, loaf, white gluten free bread or Panko crumbs)
½ cup melted butter or ghee
¼ cup brown sugar or maple syrup
½ cup slivered almonds or other chopped nuts
½ tsp cinnamon
Pinch of salt
Note* Use gluten free loaf and crumbs if you have gluten intolerance
Instructions:
Please note: this is an overnight dish.
Tear one day loaf or baguette into small chunks and spread into 9 by 13 inch baking greased dish. Mix the strawberries, rhubarb, sugar or maple syrup, add 2 tablespoons of water and put over low heat until the mixture bubbles. Remove from the heat and let cool.
Mix the eggs, milk (or substitute), cinnamon, nutmeg, sugar or maple syrup, salt and liquor (if using) with the whisk until well combined. Pour half of the egg mixture over the bread chunks.  Spread the macerated fruit mixture over the bread. Pour the remaining egg mixture over the top. Cover with film and refrigerate overnight.
Next morning preheat the oven to 350F. Mix the crumbs, butter, nuts, sugar, cinnamon and a pinch of salt. Spread the nuts-butter-crumble topping to cover the toast dish. Bake for 45-55 minutes or until the crust is golden brown and crispy, and the body of the toast is still slightly bubbling in the center. Remove from the oven and let it sit for 10-15 minutes before cutting. Serve with some extra fresh fruit and whipped cream if you like.

Cuban Ropa Veija: Shredded Veal or Beef Recipe

One of the interesting ways to give your braised veal (beef) leftovers a new life is to turn it into another great dish, Ropa Vieja. It is a traditional Cuban beef stew, which look resembles a pile of old clothes (hence, the name Ropa Vieja). The initial version of ropa vieja contained leftovers of meat and originated from Canary Islands, Spain, like many other Caribbean dishes at the times of colonialization.


The legend goes: there was once an old man who was so poor he could not buy enough food to make a family dinner, so he decided to collect the old clothes (ropa vieja), fill them with his love and cook. When he cooked the clothes, his love has turned them into a wonderful stew.


During one of our trips to Cuba, we decided to try the authentic dish in one of the picturesque colonial houses of the old town of San Juan de losRemedios. It was so tasty, I had to take notes of the recipe from the chef (see the end of this post), however this twist on the leftovers of the braised veal shoulder blade will give you an idea why is it worth trying.
Not only the dish is savory and memorable, it’s a great way to feed a big party on a budget. This traditional Cuban dish will be especially tasty if you allow the seasonings to blend for a day after making. Plus, it is a very economical way to approach your protein consumption: you get just enough of it with the meal without adding any extra to your belly fat (sorry, I have been following the course on Nutrition and Prevention of Diseases lately, so I have a re-current nightmare of visceral fat slapping my face). The following are steps on how to turn your meat leftovers into Ropa Vieja. Shred the cooked meat with two forks; sautee one chopped green pepper, with onions and garlic; add the meat, tomato coulis, wine, dash of cumin and freshly ground pepper. 
Just simmer on the low heat for 30-40 minutes, stirring often and serve with rice and black beans. 
I will definitely return to our adventures in Cuba in some other post, but, for now, here is the recipe from chef Lupe, who served us an unforgettable Ropa Vieja in Remedios.
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CUBAN ROPA VIEJA
Ingredients:
2 ½ lbs flank or swiss steak, cut in strips
5 tablespoons cooking oil (olive or other)
5 cloves of garlic, minced
1 onion, diced
1 green pepper, diced
2 cups tomato sauce (or coulis)
1 cup water
1 cup dry red wine
1 tablespoon cumin
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Instructions:
Heat 3 tablespoon of oil in the Dutch oven on medium and brown the meat on all sides. Remove the meat and put aside. Add the remaining oil, stir in onion, garlic and green pepper and cook until translucent. Return the meat to the Dutch oven, add tomato sauce, water, wine, cumin, pepper and salt. Bring to boil and simmer on a slow heat until meat is tender and shreds easily, for about 2 1/2 hours. Serve with rice and black beans, or in tortillas. Add some sour cream, cheese and fresh cilantro on the side.

Milk-Fed Veal Canapés

Here is what you can do with the cold veal blade roast you made yesterday: an intricate appetizer. The veal is tender and accentuated; you can pair it with multiple toppings, and, there are lot of things you can do with the leftovers of this roast and its braising sauce. Enjoy it as a meal on its own (like we did during our recent fishing trip) or as an hors d’oeuvre for your next cocktail party with white, rosé or any of your favorite aperitifs. This recipe yields up to 40 canapés(of course you can make less and keep the rest of the roast for your next recipe) and the execution is super-easy.)
Once the veal blade roast (please see the previous post) is cooked, cool it uncovered for one hour. Discard bones, refrigerate until cold, then cover and keep refrigerated for one day. When ready to make the veal appetizers, slice the veal and prepare your own assortment of toppings to add a touch of style and taste to your canapés. Or just layer: raclette or camembert cheese, dash of pesto, onion confit and/or porcini from the roast. Enjoy!

Cheeses like camembert and raclette make a good pick for these canapés, but fresh white stilton with apricots can add an interesting twist, especially with some Dijon. If you decide to use bruschetta in your appetizers, drain it well to ensure the base of canapés will not get soggy. The Stoneleigh sauvignon blanc, Marlborough from New Zealand (or similar) pairs really well with seafood, sushi and fish, but in this case it brings the best out of the cold veal mixed with some tangy dashes!

And, if you have any roast leftover (which you probably will in the form of meat fibers, and an awesome braising sauce), use it for some delicious pulled veal sandwiches, or even better, make something that will instantly transport you away from cold to the Caribbean! Stay tuned for our next post where we will use our veal roast leftovers in a very special traditional way.
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MILK-FED VEAL CANAPES
Ingredients:
– milk-fed veal (or beef)
shoulder blade roast carved into thin slices
– canapés bases of your choice: croutons, crackers, pastry shells, mini-pitas, sliced bread
– camembert, or raclette, or white stilton or other cheese of your choice
– pesto
– onion/porcini confit from the roast braising sauce (optional)
fresh parsley or basil leaves
Assembling the canapés:
Select your preferred base from crackers, croutons, small puff-pastry shells, mini-pitas, etc.
Remove the veal shoulder blade roast from the fridge: scrape off and discard fat from the surface. Take the veal from out of the braising liquid, scraping any sauce back into pot (keep it for the next dish along with any leftovers). Pat dry the meat with a paper towel and slice it thinly against the grain.
Spread out the bases and begin to assemble the canapés in the following order:
– cracker, raclette or camembert cheese, dash of pesto, veal roast, onion confit with or without porcini (see the image). Decorate with parsley. Once all canapés have been assembled, cover and keep refrigerated until ready to serve.
Bon Appétit!
Adapted from Milk Fed Veal Quebec Canapés.