Category Archives: roast

End of Line Adventures: Whole Fish Grilled or Baked in Salt


‘Eww, what’s that?’ I can hear you saying looking at the images while I’m posting this almost a week upon drafting (sorry, I’m temporarily in vacation and away from my computer). Well, what can I say, at least I’m not offering you a blood sausage or a liver pate (not just yet, because one day I surely will). Some foods deserve more attention than they actually get and a whole fish is one of them… I know that besides the ocean/lake taste, scaling, gutting or de-boning fish may repulse some people and I do hope you are not one of them. But if you are, in favor of its deservingly good rep among healthy celeb foodies like Martha Stewart, Gwyneth Paltrow, Sting, Trudie Styler and others, I can tell you that poached, steamed, baked, roasted or grilled whole fish is actually considered to be a light and elegant meal by many; and is a must do on many personal chefs’ menus.  This recipe is one of the easiest and the most impressive one in this repertoire.
Here is what you can do with a pack of salt and one whole fish. Just gut the fish, keep the scale on, wrap it in salt (with the choice of your seasoning) and grill it or bake it for 25 to 35 minutes depending on the size of the fish. I personally find this trick (leaving the scale on) invaluable for fishing or camping menus, when you catch a great perch or walleye (both are great tasting fish, but a bloody disaster when it comes to scaling).  The scale will come off with the salt crust easily upon cooking (where not, just gently remove it with the sharp knife). 
The result: moist, well-done, packed with oceanic or lake flavors tamed by the diffusing aromas of whichever herbs, condiment or spices (from peppercorns and bay leaf to mustard, sriracha, soya sauce, to lemon, bacon, salami, parsley, thyme, or just any edible wild grass you can find around your camping spot including young cattails shoots and wild garlic) you decide to insert in the fish cavity before encrusting it in salt.  Truly, I’ve seen no better or easier way to bake, roast or grill the whole fish to perfection, keeping it simple, not to mention the impressive presentation. Don’t worry about the saltiness, once you break off the crust and remove the salt, the flesh will be just perfectly salty and succulent. 
Earlier this summer we went for our first fishing trip this year to Champlain Lake at the US border for walleye and perch, but only caught some baby pikes, which we released back into the lake. For the times like that I always bring at least one whole fresh fish with me in the cooler to grill later on a BBQ, so we can embrace the ambiance and the great fishing spirit no matter what, and share the incredible fishing stories over the plate of what could have been the fish we caught. 

This time is was a haddock (previously I also salt-crusted successfully white fish, tilapia, perch and walleye). Haddock is great for the recipe: the flavors are enhanced and there is some smokiness added to the taste. We had it with salsa verde and fingerling potatoes and everyone loved the tender savory fillets sprinkled with parsley and drizzled with olive oil and lemon juice. 

Great tip from Gwyneth Paltrow and Julia Turshen:rub the fish with soya sauce before encrusting it in salt to give it some Asian flavor kick:
Even those in our gang who don’t usually admire any kind of fish (they fish for sport, we fish for fish) reluctantly admitted it tasted great. You will never know until you try it for yourself. Good luck fishing and grilling; and as the Irish blessing says: ‘May the holes in your net be no larger than the fish in it.’


WHOLE FISH BAKED OR GRILLED IN SALT CRUST
Ingredients:
One whole fresh fish (1 to 2 lbs), gutted, with head, tail and scales left on
1 tbsp soya sauce, rubbed in fish (optional)
8-10 black peppercorns
3 bay leaves
Small bunch of fresh parsley (or mix of parsley and thyme), chopped
2-3 lbs of coarse salt, preferably sea salt
3+ tbsp of water or beer (to mix with salt)
Lemon, butter, olive oil to sprinkle with when serving
2-3 scallions and some fresh parsley, minced, for garnish
Instructions:
Preheat the oven to 400F, or the BBQ to medium high.
Rinse the fish in cold water, pat dry with paper towels. Insert the peppercorns and parsley inside the cavity of the fish.
Mix the salt in a bowl with enough water or beer to make a consistency of the sand castle sand. Spread half quantity of the salt on a roasting pan lined with aluminum foil slightly bigger than the fish. Lay the bay leaves on the salt and place the fish on the bay leaves. Spread the remaining slat over the fish until it’s totally encrusted. Leave the tail fin exposed if necessary.
Place the pan with fish on the middle rack in the oven or on the BBQ grill and bake for 25 (for 1 lbs) to 35 (for 2 lbs fish) minutes. The salt crust will become dry and hard. Remove the fish and gently crack of the layer of salt, removing as much as you can. The skin will come off the fish as well (use the sharp knife to remove the rest if necessary).   
Remove the fish fillets and divide between warm serving plates. Drizzle with olive oil or melted butter and lemon juice and sprinkle with scallions and chopped parsley if desired.

Engagement Style Spring Chicken with Roasted Root Vegetables

This is perhaps the most festive and delicious meal I’ve made this spring so far: tender and juicy poussin with ethereal hint of lemon, cranberries and a touch of bacon smokiness on a bed of mixed potatoes roasted in the bird juices and flavored with mint – Oh là! And as much as the classic Engagement Chicken can allure you or your significant one, I guarantee you – this one is better (tested on family and friends). The Glamor’s fairy tale of irresistible roast chicken stuffed with lemons insists that the dish would put a spell on the partner and he/she would begin to think of marriage.  While the question still lingers about how a simple roast chicken can do such a miracle to hundreds of readers and, especially, to Howard Stern and his wife to be, I do believe that perfectly executed recipe of a roast chicken (Cornish hen in this case) served with a side of herbed root veggies and a glass of white Regaleali can be a bliss and will do you nothing but good. 

In Julia Child’s words: ‘ You can always judge the quality of a cook or a restaurant by its roast chicken…’. Today, I would add: fresh, free-range chicken – and, Yes, that would be step number one towards a success roast chicken story. Speaking of, I much prefer the Cornish hen (also called poussin or spring chicken) to regular chicken for its delicate and savory flesh. Last week-end I’ve googled a nice spot called Ferme D’Amours within the close reach from Montreal, where you can buy these birds of a top quality for less (around $6.00 each) than the imported ones in the grocery stores. Thirty minutes later, we were there in countryside abandon in the midst of the fertile farm fields of Monteregie with a steady hum drum of the tractors at a distance. The draft roasting project was already on my mind once we saw the directions to the farm and then there it was, the wowmoment discovering the treasures of Ferme D’Amours boutique: from Cornish hen and organic eggs to all parts of free-range chicken, as well as locally produced lamb, veal and sausages… my kind of heaven.

We bought a bunch of Cornish chicken among other things and, boy did I have fun with them!  First I made an Asian style healing soup (which I have to absolutely share with you one day), then a great Jamaican Jerk on a BBQ…

…and, finally, this dish.

For the roast spring chicken, when I was sprinkling the little hens with salt and pepper and rubbing the birds with olive oil and lemon juice, the idea of bacon bites for smokiness and cranberries for an extra boon of flavor came to my head, so I spread some bacon bits with scallions in a roasting pan, placed the seasoned chicken halves on top of them, added a handful of frozen cranberries and slid them into the oven warmed up to 450F.  Once you turn the chicken 15 minutes later, give it a splash of wine.  At the same time if wish be spread some cubed/sliced root veggies of your choice (I chose regular and sweet potatoes, but any other root veggies would be great) around the chicken and cover the pan with foil for the next 15 minutes, then remove it, add another handful of cranberries and some mint leaves and roast for another 15 minutes. Adding the mint in the process gives that unforgettable Middle Eastern touch of freshness to the roast.

While cooking, I was beaming and glowing because the smell of the dish would stream a message of happiness to my nose way before it was ready. And when taking the first bite of it I soon realized that this was a dish I wanted to stash among the happy reaches of my gastronomic mind forever.

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CRANBERRY LEMON ROAST CORNISH HEN WITH MINTED ROOT VEGGIES

Ingredients:
For Cornish hen:
1 ( 500 g to 700g) Cornish hen, split in half
Sea salt, to rub the chicken
Freshly ground pepper, to rub the chicken
½ fresh lemon juice, plus additional ½ lemon sliced
Olive oil
5 scallions, chopped (optional)
4 bacon slices, cubed (optional)
2 handfuls of frozen cranberries
½ cup dry wine
½ cup water or chicken stock
2 springs of fresh mint
For Roasted Veggies:
2 big potatoes, thick cut with skin on
3 small sweet potatoes, peeled and thick cut
2 tbsp olive oil
Sea salt
4 springs of fresh mint
Instructions:
Preheat the oven to 450F. Split chicken in halves and pat dry with paper towels. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and set aside to air dry for at least 30 minutes. Rub the lemon juice into the chicken, place the chicken into the roasting pan breast side down, sprinkle with olive oil and scatter the handful of frozen cranberries over. If using bacon bits and scallions, spread them in the roasting pan and put the chicken on top of them. Roast for about 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the wine then turn the breast side up. Lower the oven temperature to 375F. Spread the potatoes or other root veggies of your choice around the chicken, sprinkle with olive oil, cover with foil and return to the oven for 15 minutes. Remove the foil; scatter fresh mint, squeeze lemon slices and spread another handful of cranberries. Put back in the oven uncovered for another 15 minutes. After this, you can put the broil on for a few minutes to make a crisp chicken/potato skin. Remove from the oven and let stand for 10 minutes. (In the meantime, you can drain the drippings liquid and make the gravy by adding a splash of wine and a teaspoon of cornmeal (gluten free) or flour for thickening.) Serve the Cornish hen halves garnished with fresh mint on the bed of roasted veggies and with the gravy on the side.

Red Lanterns & Labrador Tea Roasted Duck

If you like duck and are open to kitchen science experiments, I’m sure this dish will make your taste buds sing. Labrador tea is an exquisite drink with a distinct woodsy-spicy taste. Combined with the cooking juice of a roasted duck in a sauce it helps to tweak the traditional roasted duck dish into an upscale dining experience you and your guests won’t soon forget. Always on the lookout for tasty tricks, I made this combination presuming that Labrador tea flavor will enhance the gamey taste of a duck in an interesting way. OMG, it was a culinary BINGO! 100 percent worth a try weather you are a chef at home or by professional definition. Although the recipe is not Asian, it was inspired by our recent visit to Chinatown.

Chinese New Year is around the corner, it’s high time to stroll down the streets of Chinatown for a festive spirit, great Asian produce and exotic sampling. If you don’t have time for that, let me give you a quick tour (along with the beautiful sound of the winter wind chimes). I’m sure any well-traveled Montrealer knows that there is more than one Chinatown in our city (Central, West and South). I’m talking about the oldest one in downtown Montreal, famous for its historic buildings and Chinese businesses and squared by St. Urbain, Rene Levesque, St. Laurent and Viger. It is not difficult to find: check for the roof-top Chinese pavilions of the Holiday Inn Select Centreville and you got it.
Montreal’s Chinatown is bustling with tourists and all kind of goods at this time of the year. Red lanterns and couplets with good luck sayings emblematic of the approaching renewal are everywhere. Why red and yellow? According to Chinese mythology, Nian, a sea monster, who comes to destroy crops and homes around the time of the Chinese New Year, is afraid of noise, sunshine and the color red.  Hence, the lucky red couplets and lanterns coupled with yellow symbols are placed beside the doors to keep the monster away and welcome good fortune, fame and riches.
The temperature is still in chilly minus twenty, which puts us in the mood to make hugs or have some comfort food.  We make our first stop at Pho Vietnam soup place located next to the famous Foo Dogs entrance into Montreal’s Chinatown. This little hole in the wall has been our favorite spot for a bowl of great piping hot noodle soup for ages (although I do also like more recent Pho Saigon Viet-Nam and Pho X.O.). I can never get enough of their fresh and crisp salad rolls, and their pho itself is simply PHO-NTASTIC!  I’ve heard people complain about how crowded this place is most of the time, but, hey, you are in Chinatown, not in a sleeping quarter. 
Speaking of the sleeping quarters, the spot is surrounded by buildings with some interesting graffiti murals, but the most impressive one is the giant mural on the Old Brewery Mission for homeless people across the street depicting 23 by 24 meters large train. My mind always wonders what was it the artist was trying to say with this mural. Although the official city’s version was ‘to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Expo 67’ (weird), to me it looks like a message saying: ‘You have just arrived to your final destination’… which is ironic considering the designation of the edifice. Is it just me or anyone else had the same association?  
We continue exploring Chinatown strolling through colorful food stalls and checking what’s up and cooking. There’ve been quite a few places newly opened recently and many that I’ve been always curious about, but never visited, like Mongolian Hot Pot, for example. Critic reviews in general are saying that on average, food spots in Montreal’s Chinatown are not as advanced as in Vancouver or Toronto and remind of a good food of the 90’ies, but see, that’s exactly why I like it: the time traveling side of it. 
We watch some people meditating next to the temple. Anyone is welcome to join, but for some reason, the daredevil spirit of adventure or Vipassana yogi is not coming upon us right now.
At some point we take a side street, get lost and talk about Woody Allen’s ‘I’m astounded by people who want to ‘know’ the universe when it’s hard enough to find your way around Chinatown.’ We wonder if we should try these stairs for a mysterious fortune telling session like his ‘Alice’ character. Well, may be some other time…
We know that the main street (rue Saint Urbain) is just a few strides away from us and the aroma of freshly roasted lacquered ducks helps us to find it back  where we get some freshly baked egg tarts, shitake mushrooms and tangerines.

Here is a good Feng shui tip for the Chinese New Year from experts: place five oranges or tangerines around your living space: one in the center and one in each direction (North, South, East and West) for good luck.

Here are some other great Feng shui tips for the 2014 year of the Wooden Horse if you like.

We dive in to sample some wontons and Peking duck specialties and finish our trip in the Chinese supermarket shopping for young duck, sticky rice cakes and red envelopes to prepare for an authentic-like Chinese-style Spring festival.
 Happy 2014 Chinese New Year of the Horse to All!

Few days later, I cook the duck for the family gathering. I know many people are reluctant to roast a duck thinking that it is much more complicated than roasting a chicken, but it is truly as simple. Believe me, the hardest part is to remove it from the packaging.

I’ve selected this particular roasting method long time ago (rummaging around many different roasted duck recipes) because it’s the least complicated and delivers tender, juicy flesh and a crisp thin skin while rendering the fat gradually without excessive smoking or a complicated cleanup later on.

In addition to seasoning, the process takes three major cooking steps: browning the duck at 400 F; baking it at 350 F; roasting it at 350 F for the crisp skin. Voila! You may choose to stuff or not stuff the bird, it will be delicious anyways, although, I tend to put one chopped apple, celery stalk, small onion and a slice of ginger into the cavity to add a layer of taste and help produce more coking juice.  I don’t scald the young duck with boiling water, but suggest do it with the mature one for a crispier skin. I don’t blow up a duck either, but agree that it’s an important part of the cooking method for a Peking duck recipe.
Here are some great tips to roast the duck:

*  Seal the cavity with a toothpick/s weather you use the stuffing or not to prevent the breasts from overcooking.
*  Prick the duck’s skin in several places with a toothpick (and scald the mature duck with boiling water) for a crispy kin and to ensure a good fat rendering during the roasting process.
*  Air dry duck in the fridge to make sure the duck is very cold before roasting as it will help to avoid overcooking the breast meat (by rendering fat from under the skin longer).

Keeping the cooking juice and separating fat from it (see in the below recipe) are important. As a result you will have a flavorful liquid to use in a sauce/gravy; and at least 100 g of pure duck fat which makes a wonderful swap for cooking oil or baking grease. The price of the store bought duck fat is around $8 to $10 per 100 g, so BAM! you got yourself a rebate of almost $10 off your duck purchase. That’s cool, no?
As usually, the devil is in detail, which is the Labrador tea mixed with the duck cooking juice (separated from fat). The result is simply unbelievable: rustic, yet sophisticated. This sauce is simple and fast to make: strain the duck cooking liquid upon roasting, cool it in a fridge to easily scoop the fat in about 15 minutes – that’s it. I am giving the detailed instructions in the recipe below.
For many Labrador tea is a drink still to be discovered. A pure boreal delight, it is aromatic and soothing with ‘rather agreeable fragrance, between turpentine and strawberries’ (according to Henry David Thoreau). Once I first tried it I could not stop brewing it. I got over my initial excitement though after I learned that Labrador tea should be handled with care (not more than a few cups per day). You can learn more about Labrador tea here.

Tips for Brewing Labrador Tea:

Crash a small handful of Labrador tea leaves in mortar or with your fingers. Add the leaves to two cups of boiling water, simmer for 1 minute and then steep for 10 minutes without the lid. Filter into cups and enjoy as is or with some honey.

Serve the roasted duck with some steamed rice, homemade kimchi and Labrador tea sauce on a side. Enjoy.
Have a great one!
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ROASTED DUCK WITH LABRADOR TEA SAUCE
Yields: 4 to 6 portions
Roasted Duck:
1 young duck
¾ cup mix of 1 apple, 1 onion, 1 celery stalk, 1 thin slice of ginger, chopped (for optional stuffing)
salt and pepper to taste
2 toothpicks to seal the cavity
Labrador Tea Sauce
1 handful of Labrador tea leaves, crushed for brewing
2 cups water
1 cup duck cooking juice, fat removed
1 tsp cornstarch, dissolved in 20 ml of cold water (optional)
1 tbsp brandy (optional)
salt and pepper to taste
Instructions:
For the Roasted Duck
Thaw the duck in the refrigerator overnight if it’s frozen. Remove packaging and any giblets in the cavity of the duck. Wash the duck thoroughly under cold running water and pat dry with paper towel. Season the duck generously with salt and pepper inside and out. Stuff the cavity of the duck with the mix of apples, celery and onion if you wish. Seal the cavity with a toothpick/s weather you use the stuffing or not to prevent the breasts from overcooking. Prick the duck’s skin in several places with a toothpick for a crispy kin and to ensure a good fat rendering during the roasting process. Air dry duck in the fridge to make sure the duck is very cold before roasting as it will help to avoid overcooking the breast meat (by rendering fat from under the skin longer).
Preheat the oven to 400 F. Place the duck in a roasting pan and cook uncovered for about 10 minutes on each side (turning once, to finish with the breast side up). Remove the roasting pan, cover it with foil and/or lid. Lower the oven temperature to 350 F and return the covered duck to the oven for 1.5 hours (make it 2-2.5 hours in case of the mature/age-unknown duck). Remove the lid/foil and finish cooking uncovered for 30 minutes, basting with dripping juice every 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and let rest for 15 minutes loosely covered with foil before carving. Serve with Labrador tea sauce and steamed rice & veggies on a side.
To Separate Fat from Cooking Juice
Remove the duck carefully to the cutting board and pour the cooking juices through a strainer into a small bowl to recuperate fat and juices. Cover and refrigerate until firm. The fat will separate to the top and solidify and the juices will jellify. Scoop the fat with a spoon into a container and reserve for further use in the fridge (confit, sauté, pancakes, French toast, veggies, etc.) Duck fat is very heat stable and makes a good alternative to cooking oil or lard. The separated cooking juice can be used right away or kept in a freezer for the future use to enhance sauces, soups and stews.
For the Labrador Tea Sauce
Add two cups of boiling water to a handful of crushed Labrador tea leaves, bring back to boil for 1 minute uncovered, turn of the heat and steep for 10 minutes. Filter and set aside to be mixed with the duck cooking juice.
Mix the duck cooking juice (separated from fat) with Labrador tea in a small pot, while bringing the mix to boil. Add brandy, mix and simmer for a few minutes (2-5) to slightly thicken and/or add the cornstarch dissolved in cold water to thicken the sauce more.

Cuban Ropa Veija: Shredded Veal or Beef Recipe

One of the interesting ways to give your braised veal (beef) leftovers a new life is to turn it into another great dish, Ropa Vieja. It is a traditional Cuban beef stew, which look resembles a pile of old clothes (hence, the name Ropa Vieja). The initial version of ropa vieja contained leftovers of meat and originated from Canary Islands, Spain, like many other Caribbean dishes at the times of colonialization.


The legend goes: there was once an old man who was so poor he could not buy enough food to make a family dinner, so he decided to collect the old clothes (ropa vieja), fill them with his love and cook. When he cooked the clothes, his love has turned them into a wonderful stew.


During one of our trips to Cuba, we decided to try the authentic dish in one of the picturesque colonial houses of the old town of San Juan de losRemedios. It was so tasty, I had to take notes of the recipe from the chef (see the end of this post), however this twist on the leftovers of the braised veal shoulder blade will give you an idea why is it worth trying.
Not only the dish is savory and memorable, it’s a great way to feed a big party on a budget. This traditional Cuban dish will be especially tasty if you allow the seasonings to blend for a day after making. Plus, it is a very economical way to approach your protein consumption: you get just enough of it with the meal without adding any extra to your belly fat (sorry, I have been following the course on Nutrition and Prevention of Diseases lately, so I have a re-current nightmare of visceral fat slapping my face). The following are steps on how to turn your meat leftovers into Ropa Vieja. Shred the cooked meat with two forks; sautee one chopped green pepper, with onions and garlic; add the meat, tomato coulis, wine, dash of cumin and freshly ground pepper. 
Just simmer on the low heat for 30-40 minutes, stirring often and serve with rice and black beans. 
I will definitely return to our adventures in Cuba in some other post, but, for now, here is the recipe from chef Lupe, who served us an unforgettable Ropa Vieja in Remedios.
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CUBAN ROPA VIEJA
Ingredients:
2 ½ lbs flank or swiss steak, cut in strips
5 tablespoons cooking oil (olive or other)
5 cloves of garlic, minced
1 onion, diced
1 green pepper, diced
2 cups tomato sauce (or coulis)
1 cup water
1 cup dry red wine
1 tablespoon cumin
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Instructions:
Heat 3 tablespoon of oil in the Dutch oven on medium and brown the meat on all sides. Remove the meat and put aside. Add the remaining oil, stir in onion, garlic and green pepper and cook until translucent. Return the meat to the Dutch oven, add tomato sauce, water, wine, cumin, pepper and salt. Bring to boil and simmer on a slow heat until meat is tender and shreds easily, for about 2 1/2 hours. Serve with rice and black beans, or in tortillas. Add some sour cream, cheese and fresh cilantro on the side.

Milk-Fed Veal Canapés

Here is what you can do with the cold veal blade roast you made yesterday: an intricate appetizer. The veal is tender and accentuated; you can pair it with multiple toppings, and, there are lot of things you can do with the leftovers of this roast and its braising sauce. Enjoy it as a meal on its own (like we did during our recent fishing trip) or as an hors d’oeuvre for your next cocktail party with white, rosé or any of your favorite aperitifs. This recipe yields up to 40 canapés(of course you can make less and keep the rest of the roast for your next recipe) and the execution is super-easy.)
Once the veal blade roast (please see the previous post) is cooked, cool it uncovered for one hour. Discard bones, refrigerate until cold, then cover and keep refrigerated for one day. When ready to make the veal appetizers, slice the veal and prepare your own assortment of toppings to add a touch of style and taste to your canapés. Or just layer: raclette or camembert cheese, dash of pesto, onion confit and/or porcini from the roast. Enjoy!

Cheeses like camembert and raclette make a good pick for these canapés, but fresh white stilton with apricots can add an interesting twist, especially with some Dijon. If you decide to use bruschetta in your appetizers, drain it well to ensure the base of canapés will not get soggy. The Stoneleigh sauvignon blanc, Marlborough from New Zealand (or similar) pairs really well with seafood, sushi and fish, but in this case it brings the best out of the cold veal mixed with some tangy dashes!

And, if you have any roast leftover (which you probably will in the form of meat fibers, and an awesome braising sauce), use it for some delicious pulled veal sandwiches, or even better, make something that will instantly transport you away from cold to the Caribbean! Stay tuned for our next post where we will use our veal roast leftovers in a very special traditional way.
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MILK-FED VEAL CANAPES
Ingredients:
– milk-fed veal (or beef)
shoulder blade roast carved into thin slices
– canapés bases of your choice: croutons, crackers, pastry shells, mini-pitas, sliced bread
– camembert, or raclette, or white stilton or other cheese of your choice
– pesto
– onion/porcini confit from the roast braising sauce (optional)
fresh parsley or basil leaves
Assembling the canapés:
Select your preferred base from crackers, croutons, small puff-pastry shells, mini-pitas, etc.
Remove the veal shoulder blade roast from the fridge: scrape off and discard fat from the surface. Take the veal from out of the braising liquid, scraping any sauce back into pot (keep it for the next dish along with any leftovers). Pat dry the meat with a paper towel and slice it thinly against the grain.
Spread out the bases and begin to assemble the canapés in the following order:
– cracker, raclette or camembert cheese, dash of pesto, veal roast, onion confit with or without porcini (see the image). Decorate with parsley. Once all canapés have been assembled, cover and keep refrigerated until ready to serve.
Bon Appétit!
Adapted from Milk Fed Veal Quebec Canapés.